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See what braces can do

Welcome to our Photo Gallery of Smiles! Feel free to click on the list of various components of malocclusions (bad bites) that typify the orthodontic problems that we commonly treat. Most cases presented here are from actual patients who were treated in our practice by our dedicated orthodontic team. Please note that some images may be inconsistent in color and clarity due to different cameras being used at different times.

Beautiful smiles are only possible with excellent patient cooperation! Please be advised that each patient and his/her case is unique, and that the relative success of treatment outcome may be somewhat variable. Unfortunately, we are unable to give advice or opinions via Internet. This site and other weblinks are for your convenience, education and informational purposes only. Specific questions or concerns regarding your particular case can be better addressed in person.

Remember, orthodontic care can contribute to a lifetime of improved oral health, appearance, comfort and enhanced personal confidence. We hope you enjoy seeing YOUR possibilities TO A GREAT NEW SMILE…

Common Bite Problems
Asymmetry Deep Overbite
Crooked Teeth Impacted Teeth
Crossbite - Anterior Missing or Tipped Teeth
Crossbite - Posterior Open Bite
Crowding Spacing

Jaw Surgery
Mandibular Advancement
(for Shorter Lower Jaw)
Maxillary Impaction
(for Gummy Smile)
Mandibular Setback
(for Longer Lower Jaw)
   

Asymmetry (Midline discrepancy)
The contacts between the right and left upper and lower front teeth do not line up when the teeth are biting together. This indicates a tooth size problem, an asymmetrical jaw relationship, posterior crossbite and/or shifted teeth to one side of the mouth. This may lead to muscle imbalance and increased muscle tension which may contribute to jaw joint clicking and pain and/or uneven, excessive wear on the biting surfaces of the teeth.

Asymmetry (Midline discrepancy)- BEFORE Asymmetry (Midline discrepancy) - AFTER

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Crooked Teeth
Crooked teeth always present areas which are very difficult to clean. Having these teeth straightened greatly enhances the ease of brushing and flossing so that normal daily oral hygiene can prevent gum and bone disease (periodontitis). Straight teeth also create better bite function for chewing and balance as well as improved psycho-social well-being by having a beautiful smile.

Crooked Teeth - BEFORE Crooked Teeth - AFTER

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Crossbite - Anterior
Here, the upper front teeth are positioned behind the lower front teeth. Chewing forces are misdirected to the teeth, and is often a major contributing cause of gum recession or bone loss around the affected teeth. This type of crossbite (‘reverse’ bite) may ‘lock’ the lower jaw into an improper bite position contributing to jaw joint clicking, pain or other symptoms. This condition may give a person an appearance of a ‘bulldog’ jaw and a facial expression of frowning.

Crossbite - Anterior - BEFORE Crossbite - Anterior - AFTER

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Crossbite - Posterior
Here, the upper back teeth are positioned to the inside of the lower back teeth. Again, chewing forces are misdirected to the teeth, and often creates a shift in jaw growth, facial asymmetry and uneven, excessive wear on the biting surfaces of the teeth.

Crossbite - Posterior - BEFORE Crossbite - Posterior - AFTER

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Crowding
In these cases, there is not enough room for all the teeth to be evenly positioned along the jaw bone. Teeth are relatively too big for the jaws. They are usually difficult to clean and pockets often develop trapping food and dental plaque which causes gum disease and eventual bone loss around the teeth. Also, teeth may be unsightly and is often the main reason why people want to have their teeth straightened.

Crowding - BEFORE Crowding - AFTER

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Deep Overbite
As you can see, the upper front teeth ‘lap over’ the lower front teeth too much. Lower front teeth often bite into the gums of the roof of the mouth (also described as an ‘impinging’ bite) causing inflammation and gum irritations.

Deep Overbite - BEFORE Deep Overbite - AFTER

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Impacted Teeth
When these developing, impacted teeth are so severely displaced, their eruption into the mouth is usually impaired. This is typically seen on X-ray and is associated with a dark cyst around the crown. These cysts may cause bone destruction and root loss (resorption) on neighboring teeth. These impacted teeth should generally be brought into the mouth, and placed in proper occlusion with braces.

Impacted Teeth - BEFORE Impacted Teeth - DURING TREATMENT

Missing or Tipped Teeth (Need for Bridge/Implant)

Missing or Tipped Teeth (Need for Bridge/Implant) - BEFORE Missing or Tipped Teeth (Need for Bridge/Implant) - DURING TREATMENT

Open Bite
Open bite describes the spaces seen between the biting surfaces of the upper and lower teeth, either in the front or back, when the other teeth are biting together. This places too much chewing force on the teeth that are touching (chewing forces should act on all teeth as a unit). A widened periodontal ligament occurs, which is more prone to periodontal breakdown. A patient may not be able to effectively chew food and may tend to swallow larger than normal mouthfuls that are more difficult to digest. In these cases, the teeth and gums are not exercised properly and can become more unhealthy.

Open Bite - BEFORE Open Bite - AFTER

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Protrusion
Here the upper front teeth are forward of the lower front teeth. This problem may be caused by long-term thumb-sucking, tongue thrust, forward tongue posture, or just genetics, e.g. the lower jaw is simply shorter than the upper jaw. The protruded front teeth are very susceptible to accident, and if, fractured, become severely weakened. Biting forces are placed excessively on the back teeth without distribution to the front teeth. Spaces often develop between these front teeth. There is usually difficulty in closing the lips over the teeth with a tendency for mouth-breathing and possible chronic bronchial infections. The gum tissue around the front teeth, when constantly exposed to the air, often become red and swollen.

Protrusion Protrusion - AFTER

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Spacing

Spacing - BEFORE Spacing - AFTER

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Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Advancement (for Shorter Lower Jaw)
These patients usually present with severe protrusion of the front teeth which is largely due to the lower jaw being significantly shorter than the upper jaw. (Often times in fact, the upper teeth and upper jaw are within normal limits.) With corrective jaw surgery, one or both upper and lower jaws can be proportionately-sized to achieve a harmonious and balanced facial profile.

Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Advancement (for Shorter Lower Jaw) - BEFORE Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Advancement (for Shorter Lower Jaw) - AFTER
Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Advancement (for Shorter Lower Jaw) - BEFORE Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Advancement (for Shorter Lower Jaw) - AFTER

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Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Setback (for Longer Lower Jaw)
These patients usually have a ‘Jay Leno’ profile or complain that chewing is difficult since the upper front teeth are significantly behind the lower front teeth. For males, a mustache may camouflage the extent of the skeletal discrepancy. However with corrective jaw surgery, one or both upper and lower jaws can be proportionately-sized to achieve a harmonious and balanced facial profile.

Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Setback (for Longer Lower Jaw) - BEFORE Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Setback (for Longer Lower Jaw) - AFTER
Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Setback (for Longer Lower Jaw) - BEFORE Jaw Surgery: Mandibular Setback (for Longer Lower Jaw) - AFTER

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Jaw Surgery: Maxillary Impaction (for Gummy Smile)
Vertical maxillary excess (a.k.a. VME) is usually marked by having excessive gum display on smile or exhibiting ‘too much tooth’ at rest. These patients are usually self-conscious of resembling ‘Mr. Ed’ and choose to have corrective jaw surgery with braces. Remember, orthodontics only corrects malposed teeth. Jaw surgery can correct misaligned jaws.

Jaw Surgery: Maxillary Impaction (for Gummy Smile) - BEFORE Jaw Surgery: Maxillary Impaction (for Gummy Smile) - AFTER
Jaw Surgery: Maxillary Impaction (for Gummy Smile) - BEFORE Jaw Surgery: Maxillary Impaction (for Gummy Smile) - AFTER

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Life with braces...